Archive | Availability

Blue Gold: World Water Wars

Posted on 26 December 2016 by asb


2008 documentary film by Sam Bozzo based on the book Blue Gold: The Fight to Stop the Corporate Theft of the World’s Water by Maude Barlow and Tony Clarke

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21st Century Pollution

21st Century Pollution

Posted on 21 December 2016 by asb

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Flow: For Love of Water

Posted on 26 November 2016 by asb

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5 things you need to know about sanitation & drinking water

Posted on 10 July 2015 by asb

The WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation was established in 1990 and has monitored changes in national, regional and global coverage ever since. The latest JMP report, Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water: 2015 Update and MDG Assessment, looks at how far we have come in the past 25 years and how far we still have to go to achieve universal access post-2015.

Here’s what you need to know:

Since 1990…

1. There have been huge gains in access to drinking water – 2.6 billion people have gained access to an improved drinking water source since 1990, and 91 per cent of the global population now uses an improved drinking water source compared to 76 per cent in 1990. An improved drinking water source is defined as one that is protected from outside contamination. These gains happened as the world’s population increased by 2 billion people from 5.3 billion in 1990 to 7.3 billion in 2015.

2. Progress has been much slower when it comes to sanitation – One third of the world’s population – 2.4 billion people – still do not have access to an improved sanitation facility, one that separates human waste from human contact. Almost a billion people (946 million) do not use any sanitation facility and defecate out in the open, in fields, bushes or bodies of water. This practice, referred to as open defecation, contaminates the environment affecting entire communities and it has been linked to childhood stunting.

3. Progress has been uneven – Where you live makes a difference. Nine out of ten people practicing open defecation and eight out of ten people without an improved drinking-water source live in rural areas. People living in sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia are particularly disadvantaged, even more so if they are poor. Meanwhile, almost all developed countries have universal access to drinking water and sanitation.

4. Data have been crucial to measuring advances and revealing insights – The JMP has monitored progress on access to water and sanitation since 1990. It has also presented data that have brought to light inequalities between various groups, including urban and rural residents, the gender burden of water collection, and the persistent exclusion of the poor from water and sanitation services. Robust and disaggregated data, insightful analysis and compelling presentation will be crucial as we transition to the Sustainable Development Goals and work towards a future where no one is left behind.

5. Water & sanitation have been fundamental to sustainable development – Without water, sanitation and hygiene, people, countries and entire economies suffer. Women spend large amounts of time fetching water and are often put at risk in the process, people are too ill to work and be productive, and millions of children die from preventable pneumonia and diarrhoeal disease. Water and sanitation are also fundamental to the realization of other human development goals.

How has your country been progressing in the areas of water and sanitation? How many more people now have access to piped water and to what extent has open defecation decreased since 1990? An interactive dashboard created by UNICEF’s Data and Analytics section shows the latest data at the country level on improved water and sanitation around the world from 1990–2015. Since national averages often hide differences, the data is shown as a total and also broken down by urban and rural areas. Data are drawn from the latest JMP report.

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The dry bed of the Stevens Creek Reservoir is seen on Thursday, March 13, 2014, in Cupertino, Calif.

Record Drought Reveals Stunning Changes Along Colorado River

Posted on 11 May 2015 by asb

A boat wends its way around the curves of Reflection Canyon, part of Lake Powell in Glen Canyon. The “bathtub rings” on the walls show past water levels.

Photograph by Michael Melford, National Geographic Creative

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future of drinking water

future of drinking water

Posted on 25 December 2014 by asb

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Water Security

Water Security

Posted on 21 December 2014 by asb

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Chasing Water

Chasing Water

Posted on 01 October 2013 by asb

Photographer Peter McBride traveled along the Colorado River from its source high in the Rocky Mountains to its historic mouth at the Sea of Cortez. In this Yale Environment 360 video, he follows the natural course of the Colorado by raft, on foot, and overhead in a small plane, telling the story of a river whose water is siphoned off at every turn, leaving it high and dry 80 miles from the sea.

In the video, McBride, a Colorado native, documents how increasing water demands have transformed the river that is the lifeblood for an arid Southwest.

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America’s Most Endangered Rivers® 2013

America’s Most Endangered Rivers® 2013

Posted on 01 October 2013 by asb

1. Colorado River
Outdated water management is threatening recreation, water supply, and wildlife habitat.
2. Flint River
Water supply for communities, farms, recreation, and wildlife are threatened by outdated water management.
3. San Saba River
The river’s flow for ranchers, citizens, and lakes might disappear from outdated water management.
4. Little Plover River
Outdated water management is putting fish habitat and water supply at risk.
5. Catawba River
Coal ash pollution is threatening drinking water and recreation.
6. Boundary Waters
Copper and nickel mining at putting recreation, drinking water, and wilderness at risk.
7. Black Warrior River
Coal mining will put drinking water quality and fish and wildlife habitat at risk.
8. Rough & Ready and Baldface Creeks
Nickel mining endangering pristine rivers, wilderness, botanical diversity and recreation.
9. Kootenai River
Open-pit coal mining is endangering water quality and survival of rare fish and wildlife.
10. Niobrara River
Improper sediment management is putting property, crops, and public safety at risk of flooding.
Special Mention: Merced River
Intentional flooding of this Wild & Scenic River would harm wildlife habitat and recreation.

http://www.americanrivers.org/endangered-rivers/

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How Earth Made Us

Posted on 01 October 2013 by asb

The incredible story of the natural forces that have shaped our history presented by Professor Iain Stewart. Our planet has amazing power, and yet that’s rarely mentioned in our history books.

This series tells the story of how the Earth has influenced human history, from the dawn of civilization to the modern industrial age. It reveals for the first time on television how geology, geography and climate have been a far more powerful influence on the human story than has previously been acknowledged. Visiting spectacular locations in Iceland, the Middle East and India, Iain shows how control over water has been central to human existence.

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Sacred Spirit of Water

Posted on 01 October 2013 by asb

Water is a living organism, water is sacred, water is life, water is worth defending and protecting for those yet unborn. Rivers and lakes in Alberta don’t stop at provincial borders. These rivers and lakes flow throughout Canada and the United States, therefore everyone will be affected by the ominous bills which have become law. Continue Reading

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Sierra Nevada 2014

All Dry on the Western Front

Posted on 30 September 2013 by asb

Sierra Nevada 20142013 was a dry year for California, but it has nothing on 2014 so far. January is on track to be California’s driest on record, and since the state receives half of its precipitation between December and February, it appears that the 2013-2014 water year could be the driest on record too. With that possibility in view, California governor, Edmund G. Brown, Jr. declared a state of emergency on January 17, urging Californians to conserve water.
Sierra Nevada 2013

From brown landscapes to the bare mountains, California is clearly dry in this view from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite, taken on January 18, 2014. The lower image, taken on January 18, 2013, contrasts last year’s drought conditions with the extreme conditions currently in place. Continue Reading

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What You Need To Know About the Availability of Consumable Water in the United States

What You Need To Know About the Availability of Consumable Water in the United States

Posted on 16 May 2013 by asb

As of Aug 2012, nearly 63% of the contiguous US was experiencing drought conditions.1 At the peak, 77% of the Central Region was experiencing moderate to exceptional drought.  Continue Reading


  1. Real-time drought dataUS Geological Survey (USGS)  

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Water changes everything

Water changes everything

Posted on 19 January 2013 by asb

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